Can ghosts hurt people?

Ghosts can hurt people, but probably not the way you’d expect.

Generally, you have a body but the ghost doesn’t. Most of the time, a ghost cannot hurt anyone physically. The exception is poltergeist phenomena which may be ghostly, but it might not.

The word poltergeist, translated literally, means “a noisy ghost.”

Poltergeist reports have included unexplained voices, knocking on walls and tables, the sound of musical instruments, and so on.

Poltergeists have been blamed for stones raining on (or inside) a house, and people being pushed, slapped, or scratched.

Ghostly assaults are very rare. Even then, people aren’t seriously hurt.

(However, if it happens around stairs, it can be dangerous. Stay away from stairways that have a history of falls or ghostly activity.)

Normal Explanations

In most cases, normal things explain or contribute to the problem.

Look for one or more of the following:

– Elevated levels of EMF from something like exposed wiring.

– Infrasound. This includes underground streams and highways — especially bridges — within a quarter mile.

– Unhealthy levels of carbon monoxide. Every home should have a carbon monoxide detector. If you’re regularly investigating abandoned buildings, a portable carbon monoxide detector should be part of your investigation kit.

– Something else that might alter perceptions and behaviors at that location. (Environmental allergies, drug reactions, etc.) Check the correlation between ghost reports at that location or in that area, against spikes in pollen and other allergens.

What Is a Poltergeist?

The subject of poltergeists is very controversial, even among those who believe.

Some psychologists think that real poltergeist phenomena are self-generated. That is, the victims are responsible.

aloneAccording to this theory, victims are individuals with extraordinary abilities. They can affect their own bodies, and remotely influence their environment.  (They’re grouped with people who receive stigmata.)

Other people, including me, suspect that two entities are involved.

– One is the person most consistently connected with the activity. He or she provides the energy, and – as a result – feels somewhat drained after a bout of activity. This person may not realize anything extraordinary is happening.

– The second “partner in crime” is an entity, perhaps unknown or paranormal, that makes the activity occur. That entity is, in a way, a parasite as well as the tormentor.

The two combine to manifest poltergeist activity.

Scientists and parapsychologists are still studying poltergeists phenomena. Patterns and answers are emerging.  No matter what your theory about poltergeists, the following  things may help.

– Treatment seems to help when it focuses on the living person most connected with the activity.

– At other times, it’s a matter of waiting for the poltergeist activity to diminish on its own.

Don’t treat the situation lightly. It’s not a “take two aspirin and call me in the morning” problem.

Analyze the situation from every possible angle, both normal and paranormal.

If the energy involves one person, he or she must be removed from the environment.  Don’t just escort the person outside.  He or she needs to be at least a dozen miles from the site.

Test that several times.  If the activity always stops when the person is far from the site, that person is part of the activity.

You’re not likely to encounter dangerous poltergeist activity, ever.

Sure, you might witness an object flying across a room or a TV turning itself on or off, but even that is pretty rare.

Generally, ghosts do not hurt people. Paranormal activity may be mischievous. It might inadvertently injure someone. That’s very different from anything demonic.

On the other hand, if there’s any possibility that demons are involved, get professional, experienced help immediately.

In over 30 years of investigating haunted locations, I’ve only been injured once. I don’t believe the injury was deliberate; it was simply a prank by a childlike spirit.

During ghost investigations, keep this in mind: You have a more to worry about from the living than the dead.

Author: Fiona Broome

Fiona Broome is a paranormal researcher and author. She describes herself as a "blip analyst," since she explores odd "blips" in reality.

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