How do people use pendulums in ghost hunting?

In ghost hunting, pendulums are divinatory tools. Ghost hunting pendulums are usually made with a weighted object suspended from the medium’s hand by way of a chain, ribbon, or string.

They’re simple, everyday pendulums, used by some ghost hunters.

In other words, there’s nothing unique that makes a pendulum a “ghost hunting pendulum.”

It’s just a moderately heavy object on a chain, ribbon, or string. You’ll hold the pendulum in one hand, suspended by whatever is attached to it, so the weight can swing freely in response to questions.

Pendulums for ghost hunting
Pendulums photo courtesy Pixabay.com

If you’re going to buy one, look for handmade pendulums that attract you. Never buy a used pendulum, no matter how pretty it is. (But, if you just can’t resist it, be sure to clear residual energy off it. Submersing it in sea salt, overnight, is one option.)

For my own ghost hunting pendulums, I’ve trusted — and give my highest recommendations to — pendulums from Sleeping Meadows. (Not online as of Nov 2016.)

In real life, I’ve also bought ghost hunting pendulums in Salem (MA, USA) from “witch-y” shops like Hex and from shops on Pickering Wharf, including Artemisia Botanicals, Laurie Cabot’s shop (now online), and NuAeon.

If the subject of witchcraft — which (in non-religious terms) I believe is firmly rooted in quantum resonance — bothers you, don’t shop at a witch-related shop. Not for any reason.

You must feel 100% comfortable with the ghost hunting tools you use. In dangerous settings, even the slightest waver can open a channel you may not have intended.

I like all the pendulums I own, but — though I rarely use them — I keep going back to my pendulums from Sleeping Meadows. They seem less formal and more user-friendly. (It’s difficult to articulate why I like them, without sounding weird and, literally, incredible.)

Make your own

You can make your own ghost hunting pendulum, easily. A ribbon and a ring or even a metal washer can work fine. Generally, the ribbon (or chain, or string) should be around eight or ten inches long, or longer.

That’s one way to see if you are adept with a pendulum, and if you like using it.

In the right person’s hands, pendulums can answer simple yes or no questions.

Also, some investigators use them to determine the direction to move in, the same as others use dowsing rods to point the way.

Maps and charts

Several remote dowsers use pendulums over maps.

Some people use pendulums with with special charts. I’ve tried them, and I wasn’t very impressed. However, you may have better results.

Some charts strongly resemble the symbols and alphabet — plus yes and no — on a Ouija board.

You can create your own charts, too. All you need is a pen and a normal sheet of paper. On it, mark years, numbers, words, colors, or compass directions. Really, there’s no limit to to the kind of charts you can design for use with a pendulum.

Hold the pendulum over your chart. Once it’s still, ask a question. The pendulum may swing to indicate the best answer on the chart. (Usually, it keeps pointing at one — and only one — answer.)

Divinatory tools are not for everyone. Always direct the spiritual energy to the tool, not to or through your hand. Prayer or shielding is a good idea, before you being your work.

My field tests

In the field, I’ve tested pendulums with people who claimed no psychic gifts.

One test involved about 20 people at haunted Gilson Road Cemetery in Nashua (NH, USA). The results were no better than a coin flip. (Keep in mind: I wanted to see if pendulums worked accurately for absolute beginners .)

My own pendulum research results have been okay, but not impressive enough to rely on pendulums for my ghost hunting research.

However, I’ve seen pendulums work really well for others.  For example, Lesley Marden’s results are impressive.

Remember, this is a controversial topic. No two researchers will answer this question the same way.

Consider all opinions carefully before using divinatory tools of any kind.

Ghost hunting pendulums can work, but — from what I’ve seen — only a small percent of researchers use them, and results vary widely.

Author: Fiona Broome

Fiona Broome is a paranormal researcher and author. She describes herself as a "blip analyst," since she explores odd "blips" in reality.

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